Black Mangabey

ZOO LOCATION: Monkey Pavilion


Lifespan: Up to 30 years

Wild Diet: Leaves, nuts, seeds, insects and spiders.

Zoo Diet: Oranges, apples, bananas, carrots, spinach and monkey chow

Predators: Predators are leopards and crowned hawk eagles

SSP: yes

IUCN Status: Near Threatened


Habitat/Range: Tropical rainforests and wetlands near equatorial Africa

Characteristics: Mangabeys have tails that are longer than their bodies, providing balance for them as they move through the rain forest canopy. Long, grayish brown whiskers that almost cover their ears and a high crest on their head - a pointy hairdo. Mangabeys weigh less than 30 lbs. and are 18-30 in. long.

Behavior: Mangabeys live in groups, called troops, of about 10-40 individuals, depending on the species and food availability. One adult male usually acts as leader and the troop's defender. Sometimes the larger troops have two or three adult males that split off with their own family units to forage for food. When males become sexually mature he leaves his troop to finds another one to join. If he can't find one, he will live alone until he does; single males do not form all-male groups. When there is plenty of food available, mangabey troops gather together for a while and even exchange troop members.

Reproduction: A single infant is born with soft fur and its eyes are open. Newborns will cling to the mother's belly; older infants often ride on her back.

Conservation: IUCN lists this mangabey species as "Near Threatened," due to the increase in hunting for the bushmeat trade and habitat loss. Bushmeat is considered the number one threat to African wildlife today. It is the commercial, illegal and unsustainable hunting of African wildlife for meat and is causing the depletion of many wild species. Conservation organizations Cheyenne Mountain Zoo and other AZA organizations support The Bushmeat Crisis Taskforce (BCTF). This group is working to solve the Bushmeat Crisis and protect African wildlife. Go to their website to learn what you can do to help: www.bushmeat.org.


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