DOWNLOAD our FREE Sustainable Palm Oil Shopping App, v2.0

Make orangutan friendly choices with the most extensive and popular sustainable palm oil mobile shopping guide. Now shop with confidence that you are doing all you can to save wild species like orangutans. Use the Sustainable Palm Oil Shopping App, produced by Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado, USA to check if the product you are about to purchase is “orangutan friendly” and RSPO certified.

App Details

  • The barcode scanner allows you to scan your favorite products and learn if the companies who make them are RSPO certified and committed to sustainable palm oil.
  • Use the app to select alternative products to those which are not certified by searching for a product type or ingredient in our “Quick Product Search” feature.
  • You can even contact RSPO member companies from the app to thank them and encourage them on their commitment to certified sustainable palm oil.
  • This App and barcode scanner are supported in the United States and Canada.

 
Download the free Sustainable Palm Oil App for Android on Google Play badge button       Download the free Sustainable Palm Oil App from the App Store badge button!


Orangutan-Friendly Shopping Guides - PDFs

Use these guides to shop for products made by companies certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil.

What is palm oil?
  • Palm oil is a form of edible vegetable oil obtained from the fruit of the African oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis). It is inexpensive and efficient, making it the world’s most widely used vegetable oil.
  • African oil palms originated in West Africa, but can flourish wherever heat and rainfall are abundant. The majority of all palm oil is grown and produced in Borneo and Sumatra, although this crop is expanding into Africa and other equatorial areas such as Latin America.
  • You probably eat and use palm oil every day; it is found in about 50% of the products you can buy from the grocery store. It is found in many foods, cosmetics and bath products.
  • Demand for palm oil is rapidly increasing because of trans-fat health concerns and bio-fuel development.

Certified Sustainable Palm Oil News.

Read Cheyenne Mountain Zoo’s Palm Oil Roundup and learn what has been happening in the world of palm oil. Find out which of your favorite U.S. companies have recently joined the RSPO and access tools to learn more, and educate others, about 100% certified sustainable palm oil that is deforestation-free!

January 29, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 1

February 20, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 2

March 20, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 3

April 17, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 4

May 21, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 5

June 25, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 6

August 20, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 7

September 20, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 8

October 22, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 9

November 20, 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 10

December 2017 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 11

January 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup Newsletter, Issue 12

February 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 13

March 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 14

April 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 15

May 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 16

June 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 17

July 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 18

August 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 19

September 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 20

October 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 21

November 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 22

December 2018 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 23

January 2019 – Palm Oil Roundup eNewsletter, Issue 24

Palm Oil Shopping Guide App

Make orangutan friendly choices with the most extensive and popular sustainable palm oil mobile shopping guide.
Download the free Sustainable Palm Oil App for Android on Google Play       Download the free Sustainable Palm Oil App from the App Store!
 

PALM OIL CRISIS: Protect Orangutans by Promoting Sustainable Palm Oil that is Deforestation-Free

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo releases all information on this web page into the public domain in an effort to promote the timely dissemination of knowledge surrounding palm oil. This applies worldwide. In some countries this may not be legally possible; if so: Cheyenne Mountain Zoo grants anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law.

Customize Materials with the Animal(s) of Your Choice

Most of the materials in the tool kit are focused on orangutans because that is the animal that Cheyenne Mountain Zoo feels best represents its own palm oil program. If orangutans are not relevant to other organizations, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo encourages those organizations to take these materials and customize them to the animal of their choice, for example from orangutan to tiger, as seen with the Spring Guides here.

Resources by Type

Expand any section below to download resources.

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Graphics for AZA Zoos
Our Graphics Library contains downloadable PDFs, and InDesign files with their corresponding document fonts, links and txt files.
 

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Palm Oil Infographics

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12-up Palm Oil App promo cards – no recycled message folder

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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Palm Oil Bookmarkers

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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Palm Oil Sticker

 

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Palm Oil Photo Props

 

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Palm Oil Banner – 5 feet wide

LINKS

 

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Palm Oil Coloring and Petition Table Signs

 

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Palm Oil App Sign – letter-size

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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Palm Oil Shopping Center Signs

PALM OIL SHOPPING CENTER SIGNS

DOCUMENT FONT

LINKS

 

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Palm Oil Business Cards

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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Palm Oil Trading Cards

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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Different Style Palm Oil Signage (Non-shopping center)

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-How Can YOU Help Orangutans?

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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-Non-Sustainable Palm Oil Affects Everyone

DOCUMENT FONTS

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-The Way Palm Oil is Grown Makes all the Difference

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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-What is Palm Oil?

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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-What is The Palm Oil Crisis?

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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-Why Not Boycott Palm Oil?

DOCUMENT FONTS

LINKS

 

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Photo Library
 
This Photo Library contains all downloadable jpeg images.
 
 

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Asian Elephants

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Bornean Orangutans

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Eco Tourism

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Indonesian & Malaysian Wildlife

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Palm Oil Photos

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Non-RSPO Certified Small Grower Plantation Pictures

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Rainforest Photos

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Restoration Sites

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Sumatran Orangutans

 

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Resource Kit
Resource Kit contains a variety of text, graphic and presentation files to download.
 

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Educational Resources

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Palm Oil Logos

 

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QR Codes

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Resources for Kids

 

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Sample Letters

 

 

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Video Library
 
This Video Library contains various downloadable WMV, MP4, MOV and AVI files.
 

 

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Orangutan Videos

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Palm Oil Videos

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Rainforest & Gibbon Sounds

 

Palm Oil Shopping Guide App

Make orangutan friendly choices with the most extensive and popular sustainable palm oil mobile shopping guide.
Download the free Sustainable Palm Oil App for Android on Google Play       Download the free Sustainable Palm Oil App from the App Store!

– Cheyenne Mountain Zoo supports newly passed principles and criteria for the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil as progress in the fight again deforestation –

November 16, 2018, Colorado Springs, CO – Cheyenne Mountain Zoo was among those who voted “Yes” on passing the ratified Principles & Criteria (P&C) during 2018’s Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) conference in Malaysia this week. The new P&C is the result of months of extensive public and stakeholder consultation representing environmental NGOs, social NGOs, retailors, consumer goods manufacturers, palm oil traders, and oil palm growers.

Supported by many environmental organizations, the new P&C includes important environmentally friendly steps forward such as regulation on High Conservation Value areas, use of the High Carbon Stock Approach toolkit, no planting on peat regardless of depth, and banning fire as a method for land preparation. The new P&C also includes strengthened requirements on labor rights such as decent living wages and housing, and strengthens the RSPO’s commitment to not condoning child or trafficked labor.

These updated environmental policies are important because:

  • High Conservation Value areas are biologically diverse areas home to rare and endangered species, ecosystems and habitats. These areas also act as an important resource for local communities and can have cultural and historical significance.
  • The High Carbon Stock Approach toolkit incorporates the latest scientific research, feedback from on-the-ground trials, and new topics and input from working groups on best practices to identify and protect tropical forests.
  • Peatlands are a “carbon sink” for the planet that store billions of tons of organic carbon that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, a heavy contributor to the changing global climate. Peatlands are also important ecosystems that are home to many unique species of plants and animals.
  • No longer allowing fire as an acceptable method for land preparation will prevent significant biodiversity and carbon loss as well as prevent the emission of dangerous pollutants that can worsen air quality and cause harm to human health.

The newly adopted environmental and social criteria marks ongoing improvement in the certified sustainable palm oil supply chain. The not-for-profit RSPO is the largest sustainable palm oil certifying scheme and takes a holistic approach to improving the supply chain by bringing all stakeholders together. Currently the RSPO has more than 4,000 members worldwide who have committed to producing, sourcing, and promoting sustainable palm oil. Certified sustainable palm oil is the best way to protect the environment, along with the people and wildlife who live there. When grown sustainably, palm oil is the best option as oil palms produce four-to-ten times more oil than other edible oil crops such as coconut, olive, sunflower and rapeseed. Boycotting palm oil will increase the demand for less eco-friendly vegetable oils and can worsen deforestation and cause it to spread to other parts of the world.

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo has been a member of the RSPO since 2010 and takes an active role in North America as a leader in the sustainable palm oil movement. The Zoo works to educate consumers on the importance of choosing sustainable palm oil and then connects them with companies who could be doing better to demand change. Cheyenne Mountain Zoo also manages a free app that consumers can utilize during shopping trips to discover which companies are working to conserve endangered species such as orangutans, tigers and rhinos. Those who wish to support orangutan-friendly companies can find the app by searching “Sustainable Palm Oil Shopping” in the app store and looking for the green orangutan, or by visiting the Zoo’s Orangutans & Palm Oil page.

 

About Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Cheyenne Mountain Zoological Society was founded in 1926. Today, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, America’s only mountain zoo, offers comprehensive education programs, exciting conservation efforts and truly fantastic animal experiences. It is Cheyenne Mountain Zoo’s hope that guests fall in love with animals and nature, and take action to protect them. Of the 233 zoos and aquariums accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is one of just ten operating without tax support. Cheyenne Mountain Zoo depends on admissions, membership dues, special event attendance and donations for funding.

Rain, snow or shine, five remaining nights of Halloween festivities begin Friday, Oct. 23 – Cheyenne Mountain Zoo will feel the Halloween spirit when little ghouls and goblins attend Boo at the Zoo, resuming with its remaining five nights on Friday, Oct. 23, 2020. The event is a fun way for families to trick-or-treat and enjoy Halloween festivities in a unique environment. This year’s Boo at the Zoo started Oct. 17-18, and resumes on Oct. 23-25 and 30-31. Boo hours are 3:40 to 8:30 p.m. Advance e-tickets are required and available at cmzoo.org/boo. The Zoo will close for daytime admission on Boo nights at 3 p.m.

In addition to visiting select animal exhibits and trick-or-treating, frightfully fun attractions include a lighted pumpkin patch, a kid-friendly spooky haunted house, Ghoulish Graveyard and Pirates Cove. Attendees can also enjoy rides on the Mountaineer Sky Ride, weather permitting. The Sky Ride will be open as weather allows, providing a breathtaking view of Colorado Springs at night and a lift to two additional trick-or-treat stations at the top.

Boo at the Zoo will go on, rain, snow or shine. As an all-weather venue, refunds and exchanges will not be honored for weather-related reasons. Be sure to bundle up on cold nights and enjoy a Colorado evening on the mountain!

An elephant-sized amount of candy (4.5 tons) will be handed out at trick-or-treat stations throughout Boo at the Zoo. The Zoo’s candy supply is purchased from companies that are members of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which is committed to the use of sustainable palm oil and the protection of orangutan habitats in the wild. To find your own Halloween candy that’s orangutan friendly, download CMZ’s sustainable palm oil shopping guide at cmzoo.org/palmoil.

COVID-19 spread prevention protocols are in place, including limited capacity throughout the Zoo, no off-site shuttle transportation, limited capacity in buildings, mask requirement for ages 11 and up in buildings, and more. Please visit cmzoo.org/open for a complete list of safety requirements and encouragements.

SELECT ANIMAL EXHIBITS ARE OPEN, INCLUDING:

– African Rift Valley giraffe building (be in line by 8 p.m.) In order to accommodate the maximum number of guests with our limited building capacity, your time in the giraffe building will be limited.
– African lions
– Australia Walkabout
– Encounter Africa elephant/rhino barn
– Goat Experience
– The Loft
– Scutes Family Gallery
– Water’s Edge: Africa

RESTAURANTS OPEN DURING BOO AT THE ZOO

– Grizzly Grill
– Pizza with a View
– Elson’s Place
– Cozy Goat (beverages only)

COSTUME REQUIREMENTS

For the safety of all guests, costume masks and costume weapons may not be worn by guests 12 years of age or older. Masks worn by guests 11 years of age and younger must have openings that allow the eyes to be seen and that do not obstruct peripheral vision. Balloons are not allowed inside the Zoo (even as part of a costume) for the safety of our animals and wild animals.

TRICK-OR-TREAT BAGS

Support the Zoo’s efforts to reduce waste by bringing your own trick-or-treat bags!

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Volunteers are crucial to the success and safety of Boo at the Zoo.
Positions include handing out or delivering candy, directing traffic and working the haunted house.
All volunteers must be at least 13 years old.
Volunteers ages 13-17 must be accompanied by a parent, guardian or school advisor at all times.
We will not assign specific positions until the evening of the event.
Curious about volunteering for Boo at the Zoo? Visit cmzoo.org/boo

FAST FACTS

Boo at the Zoo at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo
Remaining Dates: Oct. 23-25 and 30-31, 2020
3:40 to 8:30 p.m.
Advance e-tickets are required
www.cmzoo.org/boo

Boo at the Zoo is possible thanks to our generous sponsors, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Les Schwab Tire Centers, Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers, T. Rowe Price and your Colorado Springs Toyota dealers, Larry H. Miller Toyota Colorado Springs and Larry H. Miller Liberty Toyota Colorado Springs.

About Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Cheyenne Mountain Zoological Society was founded in 1926. Today, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, America’s mountain Zoo, offers comprehensive education programs, exciting conservation efforts and truly fantastic animal experiences. In 2020, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo was voted #4 Best Zoo in North America and CMZoo’s Rocky Mountain Wild was named #2 Best Zoo Exhibit in North America by USA TODAY 10Best Readers’ Choice Awards. It is Cheyenne Mountain Zoo’s goal to help guests fall in love with animals and nature, and take action to protect them. Of the 233 zoos and aquariums accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is one of just a few operating without tax support. Cheyenne Mountain Zoo depends on admissions, membership dues, special event attendance and donations for funding.

Every visit to the Zoo is conservation in action. Cheyenne Mountain Zoo and its guests and members are celebrating a huge milestone, having raised $3 million since the Zoo’s Quarters for Conservation program launched in 2008.

Quarters for Conservation, or Q4C, is the Zoo’s largest fundraiser for field conservation. It actively engages visitors and staff in supporting long-term projects championed by the Zoo. Known as legacy projects, these currently include biodiversity conservation on behalf of giraffe, Panama frogs, orangutans, black-footed ferrets, African elephants and rhinos, Wyoming toads and African vultures. Every visitor to the Zoo receives three “quarter” tokens representing the 75¢ Q4C allocation from their admission fee. They can then select the legacy projects they would like to support by placing their tokens in the corresponding slots in the Q4C kiosks. The kiosks record the number of tokens, so it’s easy to see how popular each project is.

“Our guests have helped us save animals from extinction simply by visiting the Zoo,” said Dr. Liza Dadone, vice president of mission and programs. “Three million dollars in conservation support is huge – and we want to thank our guests and members. Through this program, they are directly empowered to make a difference, and they did. It’s an example that no matter how small, when we all work together, we can change the world for the better.”

One of the projects that CMZoo recently supported and participated in on the front lines, is Operation Twiga. In November 2019, with financial support from Q4C, CMZoo staff traveled to Uganda for Operation Twiga IV. They helped transport 15 critically endangered Nubian giraffe to a safer home within Uganda, where their species has another chance at survival. As part of this project, CMZoo vet staff helped to collect important medical data for an ongoing study to help giraffe in their natural habitat and those in human care.

“We haven’t been involved in giraffe conservation that long, so this Q4c funding since 2008 has allowed us to really step up and take a leading role among Zoos in the past few years,” said Dr. Dadone. “It’s raised visibility in our Zoo community that giraffe populations aren’t safe. People see a large herd of giraffe here at the Zoo, and I think it’s easy to assume that they’re still doing okay across their native lands in Africa, but that’s no longer a reality. Giraffe are locally extinct in seven countries in Africa. Our Zoo, including our supportive community, is committed to ensuring that incredible animals like giraffe are around for the next generation.”

Q4C beneficiary species truly run the gamut, from 18-foot-tall giraffe in Africa, to tiny toads from Wyoming.
Staff member holding a Wyoming toad releasing them into the wild
“Another program I’m especially proud of is our Wyoming toad breed and release program,” said Dr. Dadone. “This species was once thought to be extinct in the wild. The only reason they exist in the wild today is because of our work and our team’s collaborations with other institutions. Some might think Wyoming toads aren’t as cute as a baby giraffe, but the toadlets are really adorable and are critical to our ecosystem and to ensuring we have a viable wildlife population in our own backyard. The research that we’ve done on headstarting [raising the toads to adulthood in the Zoo and then releasing them] and their nutrition has really improved the overall health of the last few generations of the Wyoming toad, which gives them an advantage when they are released into the wild. We’re continuing to evaluate our best practices and have an even better chance at saving this species long-term.”

Wyoming toads are symbolic of so many amphibian species in decline all over the world, including Panamanian frogs, which also receive support thanks to Q4C funds and frontline CMZoo staff support. In February 2019, three CMZoo staff members went to Panama to assist the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project by remodifying two feeder insect pods into frog pods. For this 10-day trip, the goal was to set up two shipping containers to house and breed approximately 450 additional frogs brought in from El Valle Amphibian Conservation Center, and later released. This involved disinfecting the shipping containers, painting, installing plumbing and water filtration, assembling racks, and drilling and prepping tanks.
Black-footed ferret portrait
Q4C supports an in-house breed and release program for black-footed ferrets, as well. Since 1991, when CMZoo began breeding black-footed ferrets, 567 kits have been born. Roughly half of those kits are released into the wild while the others continue breeding at CMZoo and other facilities who support this recovery effort and the Species Survival Plan. This ongoing recovery effort supports the population of black-footed ferrets, who were once thought to be extinct, and which are vital to the prairie ecosystem in Wyoming.

CMZoo’s work to save habitats for orangutans through advocacy for sustainable palm oil production is largely supported by Q4C. Thanks to that financial support, CMZoo’s sustainable palm oil team consults staff at other conservation organizations on starting their own palm oil programs and recently attended the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil’s (RSPO) annual conference in Thailand to represent CMZoo in the RSPO’s proceedings. Those proceedings directly impact the ways companies that use palm oil can help preserving wild lands for orangutans and other species.

Through Q4C, CMZoo also supports a conservation partner called Tsavo Trust – an organization in Kenya that works to protect the last of the big tuskers, which are African elephants with tusks weighing more than 100 pounds. CMZoo’s funds helped Tsavo Trust build permanent housing that allowed staff to live on the land where these critically endangered giants live. It also paid for pilot hours – frontline aerial surveillance that protects rhinos and elephants from poachers seeking their ivory.

The seventh Q4C legacy partner is VulPro – protectors of African vultures. The dedicated staff at VulPro, in South Africa, save vultures who have been injured as wild birds, and rehabilitates them to release. Those that are too injured to survive in the wild find a permanent home at VulPro.

Before launching Q4C in 2008, CMZoo was supporting conservation, but at a fraction of what is possible now. In the past few years, CMZoo has collected about half a million dollars per year through Q4C. Even with our three-month COVID-19 closure this year, the Zoo was able to hit this substantial $3 million milestone as expected.

“Small change pooled together makes a big difference,” said Dr. Dadone. “Thanks to our guests and members, we have been able to support this amazing frontline work. When we work together, we can make a positive difference for our world.”

In addition to contributions from admissions to every Zoo visit and special event ticket, $2.50 from each individual plus membership, and $5 from each family or higher-level membership, is allocated to Q4C. EdVenture and Animal department programs also contribute to the cause.

For more information about these projects and Quarters for Conservation, visit cmzoo.org/conservation.

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