Quarters for Conservation

Your Support can Change the World.

Quarters for Conservation (Q4C) is an exciting initiative that greatly enhances our wildlife conservation work. Since our Q4C program started in 2008, our guests have raised over $1,000,000 for field conservation. By collecting quarters and other coins, we fund new and existing wildlife conservation projects. This program provides an opportunity to engage our staff and our community in the effort while also significantly expanding our contributions to wildlife conservation in Colorado and around the globe. Every contribution matters!

How Q4C Works:

  1. Funding is allocated to biodiversity conservation. From the fees you pay to the Zoo, we will allocate the following amounts to conservation projects:
    • $0.75 from each admission fee
    • $2.50 from each individual plus membership
    • $5 from each family or higher membership
    • A portion of each education and animal program
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  3. Learn about each project and contribute to the project(s) you’d like to fund. On every visit, you’ll receive three “quarter” tokens. Use the tokens you receive, or your spare change, to show your support for the conservation projects that inspire you at the token kiosks, located inside the Zoo’s Entry Plaza. Take some time as you visit animal exhibits, hear keeper talks, see natural behavior shows or read signage around the Zoo, and to discuss this information with your family and friends. Discover suggestions as to how you can make a difference in preserving our planet’s limited resources and help the Q4C projects that you wish to support.

    Additional contributions can be made with real quarters – 100% of any added contributions will go toward the selected project. Total contributions are calculated annually from May through April.

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  5. Want to do More?Throughout the Zoo, you’ll find signs that list more ways to support these conservation efforts. Right here you can donate now. Below, there are online resources to learn more included with each project overview. Discover all you can about the six projects we’re supporting this year and share the information with your family and friends. Thank you for joining our efforts, together we can change the world!


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Projects that will receive 2016-2017 Q4C funding:



Help Rescue Frogs in Panama.

Up to half of all the world’s amphibian species are in danger of disappearing forever. A key cause of extinction is a fatal chytrid fungus spreading around the world. Chytrid travels quickly; in about five months it can wipe out 80% of all frogs and salamanders in its path. Chytrid is now spreading to the mountains of Eastern Panama. Up to 50 species in this area are at grave risk of extinction as the fungus advances at more than 20 miles per year. Quarters for Conservation helps rescue and breed frog species at risk of extinction. It also supports research to find a cure for chytrid in the wild.

Discover: Ways You Can Help
Learn more at the Zoo: Visit the Aquatics Building
Learn more online: www.amphibianrescue.org



Help Protect Wild Orangutans and Their Habitat.

Clearing of forests in Borneo and Sumatra for non-sustainable palm oil plantations and illegal logging is destroying orangutan habitat. When the forests are cut down, orangutans lose their homes and food. Unfortunately, many starve while others are orphaned, displaced or killed. Quarters for Conservation supports Cheyenne Mountain Zoo’s effort to lead a national sustainable palm oil awareness campaign to help protect wild orangutans’ remaining habitat.

Discover: Ways You Can Help
Learn more at the Zoo: Visit the Action Station in Primate World, or check out Orangutan Art
Learn more online: Palm Oil Crisis



Help Restore Black Footed-ferrets into North American Plains.

The only ferret native to North America, the black-footed ferret (BFF) once thrived across grass prairies from Canada to Mexico. But today it is one of the most endangered mammals in North America. Black-footed ferrets came to the brink of extinction in the mid 1980’s when only eighteen animals remained. The main cause of their decline was loss of habitat as a result of disease and extermination of prairie dogs, the ferrets’ primary food source. To restore the native ferret population to North America’s Great Plains, five zoos, including Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, have partnered with the US Fish and Wildlife Service in an aggressive captive breeding and reintroduction program that is making progress toward recovering the native ferret population. The zoo has had over 530 ferret kits born and over half of those were preconditioned for release back into the wild while the remaining have been retained for assurance population growth in human care.

Learn more at the Zoo: Visit The Loft to see a black-footed ferret, or check out CMZoo’s BFF Recovery Program
Learn more online: http://www.blackfootedferret.org



Help Raise and Release Wyoming Toads.

One of the most endangered amphibians in the world, the Wyoming toad was once abundant in Wyoming’s wetlands. But pollution from pesticide runoff, habitat destruction, and a fungal disease called chytrid have all had disastrous consequences for this toad. In 1994, Wyoming toads went extinct in the wild, and only one captive population remained. That population became the foundation for a captive breeding program in eleven zoo and federal facilities, producing tadpoles, toadlets and toads for reintroduction to the wild. To date, 16,552 tadpoles, 184 toadlets and 239 overwintered one year old toads have been released by Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. The Zoo’s Amphibian Propagation Center has raised toads for breeding and for release every spring into their protected habitat in Wyoming.

Learn more at the Zoo: Check out CMZoo’s Wyoming Toad Recovery Program
Learn more online: http://amphibianrescue.org/tag/wyoming-toad/



Help Save Wild Giraffe in Africa.

In the past 20 years, there has been an estimated 35% decline in wild giraffe populations. In 1998 the IUCN estimated the total number of giraffe in Africa to exceed 140,000, but by 2016, this number has dropped to fewer than 90,000 individuals. Thus far there has been limited research and conservation efforts on wild giraffe, so the extent of their conservation threats are often undetermined. Cheyenne Mountain Zoo has partnered with the Giraffe Conservation Foundation to support much-needed field research on the different giraffe subspecies and to help with multiple conservation strategies. In January 2016, the Zoo provided financial support and a staff veterinarian to help translocate 18 Rothschild’s giraffe in Uganda back to a historic home range across the Nile River.

Learn more at the Zoo: Check out CMZoo’s Giraffe Conservation Program



Help Protect African Elephants and Rhinos.

African elephant and rhinoceros poaching has escalated in the past few years. At current rates, wild African elephants could go extinct in the next 15-20 years and wild black rhinoceros could go extinct in the next 5 years. When these megavertebrates are killed, this impacts local ecotourism and changes the landscape of the parks, which also impacts biodiversity. Cheyenne Mountain Zoo has partnered with the Tsavo Trust to help protect elephants and rhinos in the largest national park in Kenya. Using both aerial surveys and ground patrols, Tsavo Trust helps prevent poaching in an effort to keep these iconic animals around for future generations.

Learn more at the Zoo: Check out our African Elephant and Rhinos Conservation Program



For more ideas about how you can make a difference in safeguarding our planet’s wildlife and wild places, see the informative graphics about each project located throughout the Zoo. Maybe you and your family and friends will get inspired to take some conservation action to have a real impact. Thank you for caring!

Through Quarters for Conservation, you’ll be directly
supporting critical conservation projects every time you visit the Zoo!

Past Quarters for Conservation Project Summaries by Year

Since the beginning of the program in the spring of 2008, Quarters for Conservation has cultivated over $1 million dollars with guest token contributions, that went to fund designated conservation programs both regionally and globally. Discover below how Q4C has grown!

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2015-2016 Quarters for Conservation Project Summary

The funds collected, one quarter at a time, for 2015-16 cycle was $170,344! Of this amount, 50% supports on-going flagship field conservation programs at the Zoo, (such as black-footed ferrets and Wyoming toads). The other half, plus donations, is dedicated to the six Quarters for Conservation field programs that zoo guests vote on every time they come to the Zoo.
Based upon your votes, here’s how the Quarters for Conservation funds were distributed among the important field projects!

Here’s how the money raised for the Quarters for Conservation programs was distributed based upon your votes:

  • African Elephants & Rhinos: $22,510 or 26%
  • Black-footed Ferrets: $11,927 or 13%
  • Giraffes: $19,401 or 22%
  • Orangutans/Palm Oil: $16,512 or 19%
  • Panama Amphibians: $9,238 or 10%
  • Wyoming Toads: $8,663 or 10%

Total raised for projects: $88,251

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2014-2015 Quarters for Conservation Project Summary

The funds collected, one quarter at a time, for 2014-15 cycle was $145,751! Of this amount, 50% supports on-going flagship field conservation programs at the Zoo, (such as black-footed ferrets and Wyoming toads). The other half, plus donations, is dedicated to the six Quarters for Conservation field programs that zoo guests vote on every time they come to the Zoo.
Based upon your votes, here’s how the Quarters for Conservation funds were distributed among the important field projects!

Here’s how the money raised for the Quarters for Conservation programs was distributed based upon your votes:

  • Panama Amphibians: $8,556 or 12%
  • Orangutans/Palm Oil: $12,712 or 17%
  • Black-footed Ferrets: $2,690 or 3%
  • Wyoming Toads: $2,440 or 3%
  • African Penguins: $8,868 or 12% (voting active for 9 months)
  • Mexican Gray Wolves: $13,012 or 17% (voting active for 9 months)
  • Amur Leopards/Tigers: $14,390 or 19% (voting active for 7 months)
  • Greenback Cutthroat Trout: $6,120 or 8% (voting active for 7 months)
  • Elephants & Rhinos: $3,650 or 5% (voting active for 3 months)
  • Giraffes: $3,010 or 4% (voting active for 2 months)

Total raised for projects: $75,449

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2013-2014 Quarters for Conservation Project Summary

The funds collected, one quarter at a time, for 2013-14 cycle was $129,543! Of this amount, 50% supports on-going flagship field conservation programs at the Zoo, (such as black-footed ferrets and Wyoming toads). The other half, plus donations, is dedicated to the six Quarters for Conservation field programs that zoo guests vote on every time they come to the Zoo.
Based upon your votes, here’s how the Quarters for Conservation funds were distributed among the six important field projects!

Here’s how the money raised for the six Quarters for Conservation programs was distributed based upon your votes:

  • Amur Leopards/Tigers: $17,284 or 27%
  • Panama Amphibians: $6,556 or 10%
  • African Penguins: $9,876 or 15%
  • Mexican Gray Wolves: $13,187 or 20%
  • Greenback Cutthroat Trout: $8,634 or 13%
  • Orangutans/Palm Oil: $10,093 or 15%

Total raised for projects: $65,630

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2012-2013 Quarters for Conservation Project Summary

The dollar amount collected for the just completed fifth year of the program, which runs annually May through April, is $116,202. Of this amount, 50% is designated for on-going flagship conservation programs at the Zoo. The other half is earmarked for the six Quarters for Conservation programs that guests have been voting on for the past 12 months.

Here’s how the money raised for the six Quarters for Conservation programs was distributed based upon your votes:

  • African Elephants & Rhinos: $13,811 or 22%
  • African Penguins: $12,722 or 21%
  • Orangutan/Palm Oil: $11,622 or 20%
  • Panama Amphibians: $7,214 or 12%
  • African Vultures: $6,808 or 11%
  • Colorado Migratory Birds: $8,897 or 14%

Total raised for projects: $61,077

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2011-2012 Quarters for Conservation Project Summary

The dollar amount collected for the just completed fourth year of the program, which runs annually May through April, is $129,428. Of this amount, 50% is designated for on-going flagship conservation programs at the Zoo. The other half is earmarked for the six Quarters for Conservation programs that guests have been voting on for the past 12 months.

Here’s how the money raised for the six Quarters for Conservation programs was distributed based upon your votes:

  • Amur Leopards/Tigers: $15,716 or 23%
  • African Penguins: $15,955 or 23%
  • Orangutan/Palm Oil: $10,018 or 15%
  • Panama Amphibians: $8,911 or 14%
  • African Vultures: $9,358 or 13%
  • Gibbons: $7,472 or 11%

Total raised for projects: $67,430

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2010-2011 Quarters for Conservation Project Summary

Since the beginning of the program in the spring of 2008, Quarters for Conservation has cultivated hundreds of thousands of dollars with guests voting one quarter at a time, that went to fund designated conservation programs both regionally and globally. The dollar amount collected for the just completed third year of the program, which runs annually May through April, is $123,355. Of this amount, 50% is designated for on-going flagship conservation programs at the Zoo. The other half is earmarked for the six Quarters for Conservation programs that guests have been voting on for the past 12 months.

Here’s how the money raised for the six Quarters for Conservation programs was distributed based upon your votes:

  • To help save wild Amur leopards and tigers:  $9,070
  • To help protect wild African vultures:  $7,655
  • To help raise and protect wild African penguins:  $11,882
  • To help rescue frogs in Panama:  $8,422
  • To help protect endangered wild orangutans and their forest habitat:  $12,521
  • To help protect wild snow leopards:  $17,666

Total raised for projects: $67,215

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2009-2010 Quarters for Conservation Project Summary

Since the beginning of the program in the spring of 2008, Quarters for Conservation has cultivated hundreds of thousands of dollars with guests voting one quarter at a time, that went to fund designated conservation programs both regionally and globally. The dollar amount collected for the just completed second year of the program, which runs annually May through April, is $111,617. Of this amount, 50% is designated for on-going flagship conservation programs at the Zoo. The other half is earmarked for the six Quarters for Conservation programs that guests have been voting on for the past 12 months. An additional $5,624 in specific donations was donated to the program aside from the voting kiosks, bringing the grand total of funding for the six 2009-2010 programs to $57,052.

Here’s how the money raised for the six Quarters for Conservation programs was distributed based upon your votes:

  • Endangered Wild Orangutans and their forest habitat:  $13,689
  • Native Skippers in Colorado:  $10,804
  • Wild Andean Bears in Ecuador:  $9,788
  • Bats in Colorado and throughout North America:  $8,669
  • Amphibians in Panama:  $7,305
  • Wild African Vultures:  $6,797

Total raised for projects: $57,052

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2008-2009 Quarters for Conservation Project Summary

On April 30th, 2009, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo finished its inagural year of the Quarters for Conservation program, which dedicates a portion of the fees you pay for Zoo admission, memberships and classes to wildlife conservation. That means every time you visited the Zoo this past year, you helped expand conservation efforts in our region and around the globe. Approximately $105,007 was raised through this program; 50% of which goes to support the Zoo’s ongoing conservation programs. Here’s how the remainder of the funds raised were distributed based upon your votes:

Here’s how the money raised for the six Quarters for Conservation programs was distributed based upon your votes:

  • Endangered Snow Leopards in Central Asia: $14,212
  • African Lion Conservation in Kenya: $9,007
  • Wild Orangutan Survival in Borneo: $8,980
  • Endangered Colorado Butterflies: $8,256
  • Andean Bear Conservation in Ecuador: $7,230
  • Mantella Frog Conservation in Madagascar: $6,148

Total raised for projects: $53,833

 

These projects are putting these significant funds to work to save species in peril of extinction.

Thank you for making this possible for the future of wildlife and wild places.

Every Contribution Matters.